Death by Virtual Meeting - Fascinnovation
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Death by Virtual Meeting

frustrated at computer

Death by Virtual Meeting

Death by Virtual Meeting will be carved on our tombstone if COVID-19 doesn't get us.

We called it “Death by Powerpoint” when your colleague would get in front of the room and talk to 130 slides during their presentation. Today, we are experiencing something similar when our days start at 8am with our first virtual meeting and finishes at 6pm with our last. Death by Virtual Meeting will be carved on our tombstone if COVID-19 doesn’t get us.

So, if your days are filled with back to back virtual meetings coupled with coping with your kids being duct taped to the dining room furniture, watch my latest vlog.

What can we do to make these virtual meetings better? Here are 4 hard and fast rules about virtual meetings in this reality

1. Keep groups small

In a meeting room at the office, there is an exchange of information and a discussion. Adults absorb and internalize information by discussing it and applying to their reality. If your meeting is too large, people won’t have a chance to discuss and it will turn into a 1 person speech from the throne

2. Use video

Don’t let anyone use the excuse that their internet connection is bad or they haven’t showered. Get everyone on video and use the “Brady Bunch” or “Hollywood Squares” view so everyone can see each other. This creates engagement and accountability for participants as it discourages texting, typing, and side chats.

3. Let go of your Power Point

Don’t use the platform to share your slides with the group. Use the virtual meeting platform for the communication. If you need people to follow along with some documentation, send it to them ahead of time so they can print it. It’s hard enough to keep people engaged in face to face meeting when using slides, if you start going through your slides you spent last night preparing, you will lose them even faster. Remember – adults have an attention capacity of 20 minutes during didactic presentations.

4. Timing

Do any of us know what day of the week it is? Our schedules are different now. Look at alternatives with your team to have meetings. If all of you have young kids, maybe 8:30 at night after the kids are asleep is the best time. The other element of timing is start and end time. Expect to only have 45 minute meetings as people sign on late because they haven’t had a bathroom break.

If you would like some help with your virtual meetings or remote training sessions, contact us for FREE 30 minute consultation on how to make your meetings more effective

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